Why you (yes, YOU) need IPv6

“There’s no business case for IPv6.” “There’s no killer app for IPv6.” “I still have plenty of IPv4 addresses.” And so on and so forth. Who knew that the IETF was so wrong when they decided in 1992 that the world needed a new Internet protocol?

Well, there may be no killer app, but let’s look at why you (yes, you) should be interested in migrating your network to IPv6. In the teeth of the naysayers.

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IPv6 – too many addresses?

Talking with people about IPv6, I regularly hear the complaint that IPv6 subnets have “too many addresses”. That it is “wasteful” to use /64 subnets, and that we should subnet down to “more realistic” subnet sizes. The complaint comes from IPv4-think, and here’s why:

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Why “why” matters

A participant on the NANOG mailing list recently made the comment that “with a small amount of conceptual knowledge, the differences between IPv4 and IPv6 become very very small.” True! And perhaps an anecdote will illustrate why conceptual knowledge, not just practical know-how, is sometimes important.

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Subnet Router Anycast Addresses – what are they, how do they work?

Discussions on several mailing lists have shown that there is still a lot of misunderstanding”out there” about what subnet router anycast addresses are, and how they work. This article aims to help out, because the concept is actually pretty simple.

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Eclipse, EGit and IPv6

After too long, I finally decided to make the move from Subversion to git for version control. Since I use Eclipse for just about all my development, the first order of business was to install the standard Eclipse git plugin, EGit. To my delight it turns out that EGit is installed by default with Kepler (the latest version of Eclipse). I was less delighted to find it didn’t work with IPv6. Or did it?

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Mikrotik DNS case-INsensitivity issue

Got an email a while ago from a chap who was having some difficulty with a Pioneer device; specifically a Pioneer VSX-53 (http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Home/AV-Receivers/Elite+Receivers/VSX-53). The Pioneer was unable to resolve a particular name. The Pioneer was connected to the internet via a MikroTik RB951G, which was also acting as a DHCP server and giving out its own address as the nameserver. It seemed to be some kind of problem with the MikroTik RB951G being used as a caching nameserver, because when the MikroTik was configured to hand out the addresses of the Google public nameservers (8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4), the name resolved just fine. Hmm!

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/64 subnets – a waste of IPv6 address space?

The discussion pops up again and again – someone says “but /64 subnets are such a waste! Surely we only need n bits?” (where “n” is any number smaller than 64). Then someone chimes in and says “we should have choice! Just remove that standard.” Someone else adds “you could do SLAAC in smaller subnets you know…” – and around we go again. This post is my take on the “/64 everywhere” idea, and let me say up front I am for it!

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MikroTik and NetInstall

Today I bricked a MikroTik router. I have no idea what went wrong, but after upgrading an RB951G to 5.25, it was, um, uncommunicative. No SSID visible, no DHCP happening on the Ethernet ports, no response even when I set up a static address on the other end of the Ethernet. An enquiry to the ever helpful Mike Everest at Duxtel suggested I should try NetInstall and directed me to this wiki entry from MikroTik. If you use MikroTik routers and feel you too would like to know how to bring one back from the brink, read on.

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DHCPv6 – is REBIND pointless?

As part of improving our course materials, I was refreshing my understanding of DHCPv6 a couple of days ago, and found myself thinking about the REBIND message. After close consideration of the relevant RFC (RFC 3315), and even posting a question about it to the IETF mailing list, I came to the conclusion that REBIND, as it now stands, is a pretty pointless message.

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Into6 presents to IntoIT (no relation)

Last Saturday (that’s 15 June 2013, posterity) I presented an introduction to MikroTik routers to a local IT interest group, IntoIT. The name is coincidence, there’s no link between IntoIT and Into6 :-)

We only had two hours, so we barely scratched the surface, but attendees got to have a close look at a couple of MikroTik routers and configure them up from scratch. It was a fun evening. Liam O’Duibhir, who organised the evening (thanks Liam!), has blogged about it on the IntoIT blog, so I won’t duplicate his effort – go there for a look. If you are interested in the slides I used, the slidepack is there too, or get it here (PDF, 1MB).

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MikroTik, IPv6, GRE6 and OSPFv3

This is not a very interesting post, but perhaps it will show up in a search and save some poor soul the hour or two I wasted.

I was trying to a get a GRE6 tunnel up between two MikroTik routers and run OSPFv3 across it. One router was my main home router, which has been up and running for months. The other was a RB951G that I use for experimentation. Three things got in my way.

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